Books

8 Amazon Kindle books for summer reading

Here are 8 books an e reader should try to kill time this summer

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Long summer days are here and it’s quite possible for everyone to actually run out of plans for a day. With the scorching sun outside, outdoor plans are seemingly inconvenient. Therefore, reading is your best shot at keeping your vacations interesting and avoiding boredom. What’s better is that if you’re an e-reader you can switch between multiple books at one time. Below are some suggestions for avid book readers.

  1. The last house guest by Megan Miranda
    The story revolves around two female protagonists in the vacation town ‘Maine’. Sadie Loman who belongs to a wealthy holiday makers family and Avery Greer who is a resident on Maine and serves the wealthy holiday makers. A friendship like theirs is rare and unheard of. After the mysterious death of Sadie, the police rule it out as suicide and there are a few people who blame Avery for it. Avery must go out and clear her name before the facts get twisted.
  2. Man of the year by Caroline Louise Walker
    “The man of the year” Dr. Robert Hart is everything any person would wish to be, a successful doctor, perfect family, perfect house. Everything about the man seems enviable. Until his son’s friend comes over to stay and things start falling apart. In Caroline Louis Walker’s debut novel, you experience a plot like none other.
  3. Where the crawdads sing by Delia Owens
    For years Kya Clark (the so called ‘Marsh Girl’) has haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. It’s not until  late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead and locals don’t spare a moment to suspect Kya the beautiful, sensitive and intelligent girl who survived alone in the marshes for years. This is a murder mystery which will keep everyone hooked to their seats.
  4. God, war and providence by James A. Warren
    A piece of fascinating historical fiction which is based in early 1600s and narrates the initial struggle between white settlers and native Americans. In his book God, war and providence you see Warren shedding light over an important part of history.
  5. Slaves in the family by Edward Ball
    A descendant of Charleston slaveholders, journalist Edward Ball uncovers his family’s history with slavery. He digs up his ancestral records and reaches out to the descendants of the enslaved
    With the help of historical documents, oral histories and devastating stories he painted a picture of what it was like during the plantation era.
  6. The stationary shop by Marjan Kamali
    The story goes back to 1953. Roya a dreamy teenager living in Tehran finds a safe haven for herself in Mr. Fakhri’s neighborhood book and stationery shop during the political upheaval at that time. When Mr. Fakhri introduces her to other favorite customer Bahman, the two fall in love with each other. Some time later, on the eve of their marriage violence erupts and Roya never sees Bahman again until fate reunites them 60 years later and Roya finally understands why he left.
  7. Advice for future corpses by Sallie Tisdale
    In  “Advice for future corpses (and those who love them) former nurse Sallie Tisdale offers practical yet humorous advice to her readers and shares her perspective about death and caring for those who are terminally ill. The book ranges from things one should say or not say in front of the dying person to what should one expect in their final hours. She narrates personal stories as well as the believes of people from different cultures and regions of the world.
  8. The subtle art of not giving a f*ck by Mark Mansons
    This is somewhat a self-help book and totally recommended for a light reading. Masom tells readers how being positive all the time is crap, one can be better humans if they aren’t too focused on being positive all the time! He makes an argument which is backed by academic research and jokes itself at how learning how to digest lemons properly is better than making lemonade out of them. The book focuses on improving our lives hinges and embrace our true selves.

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