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Oye Yeah Review: Hua Kuch Yoon has its power in the message it delivers

It’s a love story played in the backdrop of India-Pakistan politics

Hua Kuch Yoon reviewHua Kuch Yoon - A play by Dawar Mehmood - OyeYeah News
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Dawar Mahmood has entertained us with Pawney 14 August, Aangan Terha, Sawa 14 August, Siachen and others. His combination with the legendary Anwar Maqsood has delivered so beautifully. KopyKats Productions has given audiences something to enjoy. This time around, Hua Kuch Yoon was written by the famed actor, Sajid Hasan. This play may not be termed as entertaining but has a deep message which would resonate in the times of India Pakistan tension.

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The story begins with the Jallianwala Bagh massacre. Children of those killed, are sent to a boarding house, where they can be adopted. This is where the love story begins and continues to the Musharaf era. There are various scenes from Hyde Park of London to a flat of Gulistan e Jauhar, but everything

gears towards the same message. The idea that politics, partition, murder and division gets in the way of the two beings who love each other and want to share their lives with each other.

There is a lot of historical context, with both our lead characters carrying a different political ideology. There are confrontational scenes, there are moments of love declaration and there are few moments of violence too. However, like two parallels lines, their relationship seems destined to be together without ever coming together.

However, the length of the play makes it slow. There are a few scenes which continue without much purpose. It would have been much better had, the writer focused more on the message than creating prolonged situations. However, there is comic relief every so often, which keeps the audiences interested.

The changes in set, would have required incredible amount of work and precision in its execution. Kudos to everyone for pulling it off. Acting skills were on point. The play had 100 actors, so to just manage the human resource aspect of it is a remarkable job. Performances of Faraz Ali, Fareeha Raza, Taha Humayun, Saad Farukh Khan, Mujtaba Rizvi, Adil Bangash and Maria Saad provided strength and the required honesty to the play’s message.

Watch the play at Arts Council. It  runs till 15th March.

the authorAsjad Khan

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