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‘Sin Tax’ to be imposed on tobacco products in Pakistan

Social media reacts to govt’s proposition of ‘sin tax’ on tobacco products.

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Pakistan government will be imposing a ‘Sin Tax’ on all tobacco products, which is most likely to increase cigarette prices. National Health Services Minister Aamer Mehmood Khan has announced on Tuesday that the government has decided to impose a ‘sin tax’ on all tobacco products.

While addressing the Annual Public Health Conference, the minister said that a ‘sin tax’ bill would be sent in the National Assembly. “According to that bill, taxes would be imposed on cigarettes and tobacco products”, told the federal minster.

The minister further said, “Tax received from this would be spent on the youth including their human development and education.” Pakistan would be following into the footsteps of the Philippines for imposing a sin tax on tobacco.

In 2017, the World Bank cited the sin tax reform in the Philippines as among the most successful tobacco taxation which not only helped in the increase of revenues for the country but also cut down on the number of smokers.

A sin tax is imposed on specific goods and services at the time of purchase that are considered harmful to society and individuals, for example alcohol, tobacco and gambling ventures. There are various countries, who have imposed sin tax on alcoholic items and on energy drinks.

Following the news regarding ‘Sin Tax’ being imposed, here is how twitter reacts to the development:

https://twitter.com/laltaintabahde/status/1069982047496757249


https://twitter.com/mariamsmadness/status/1070020783727099904


https://twitter.com/keenmind_/status/1069955864788918273

Most interesting response came from Faisal Vawda, who is the Federal Minister for Water Resources. Here is what he thinks of the ‘Sin Tax’.

The minister took to Twitter and said, “I’m a chain cigarette smoker myself and I appreciate all the measures taken by the government to discourage smoking and I understand it’s injurious to health but this term “Gunnah Tax” is inappropriate. If this is gunnah then what would we name and term the actual gunnahs.”

the authorSaman Siddiqui
Saman Siddiqui, A freelance journalist with a Master’s Degree in Mass Communication and MS in Peace and Conflict Studies. Associated with the media industry since 2006. Experience in various capacities including Program Host, Researcher, News Producer, Documentary Making, Voice Over, Content Writing Copy Editing, and Blogging, and currently associated with OyeYeah since 2018, working as an Editor.

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