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Inflation in the month of July soars to 24.9%, the highest in 14 years in Pakistan

According to the PBS data, inflation was measured at 23.6pc in urban areas and 26.93pc in rural areas.

Inflation soars to 24.9%Inflation in the month of July soars to 24.9% | OyeYeah News
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Inflation in the month of July has soared to 24.9%, which is the historic highest in fourteen years in Pakistan.

Pakistan Bureau of Statistics (PBS) on Monday released the figures according to which the 24.9% inflation is the highest ever year-on-year rise since November 2008.

According to the PBS data, inflation was measured at 23.6% in urban areas and 26.93% in rural areas.

As per the newly released statistics, the prices of electricity soared by 86.7%, ghee by 74%, and cooking oil by 72.5% as compared to the prices of these commodities in July 2021.

According to the PBS, vegetables became 24% more expensive in the month of July when compared to the prices in June.

In a period of one month, Dal Chana became expensive by 13.8%, onion by 13.6%, potatoes by 10.8%, and gram flour by 10%.

In July, wheat prices increased by 9.75%, Dal Mash by 9.3%, and Dal Masoor by 9%.

Further more in a period of one month, tea prices soared by 8.98%, eggs by 8%, and cooking oil by 7.6%.

In the month of July, electricity prices were jacked up by 39.35%. Flour became expensive by 6.3% and ghee by 5%.

In one month, the motor fuel prices increased by 7.35%.

If compared on a year-on-year basis, the motor fuel prices rose by 94.42% in July 2022 as compared to July 2021.

Electricity became 86.7% more expensive this year as compared to the last year.

Liquefied gas prices saw increase by 45.6%.

The prices of stationery increased by 34.8%,

The prices of commodities including Dal Masoor was increased by 92.4%, onion 89.4%, mustard oil 81.95%, ghee 74%, cooking oil 72.5%, chickpeas 67.4%, chicken 59%, wheat 45%, Dal Chana 43.2%, vegetable 40.4%, fruit 39.2%, gram flour 37.5%, Dal Mash 35.6% and rice prices increased by 31.2% in July 2022 as compared to July 2021.

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